Response published in Nature

March 28, 2012 at 10:13 am
Contributed by: Chris

I co-authored and co-signed a response to the Murray/King article on peak oil published in Nature in January (which I discussed here), which was published today. It was heavily edited but the main point was made: peak oil should be taken seriously and the research on it given due consideration in scientific journals like Nature. You can read the comment (pdf) here: Murphy_2012_Nature Correspondence.

Scoring the rhetoric on Obama’s energy policies

March 21, 2012 at 2:08 pm
Contributed by: Chris

For SmartPlanet this week, I explored the data on domestic U.S. production of fossil fuels to see if presidential policies affect it. President Obama takes credit for increasing fossil fuel production, while the fossil fuel industry blames him for falling production. So what’s the truth? Read my analysis here: Scoring the rhetoric on Obama’s energy policies
(more…)

Guest on Warren Olney’s radio show, To The Point

March 21, 2012 at 2:00 pm
Contributed by: Chris

I appeared as a guest today on Warren Olney’s radio show, To The Point, which is syndicated on Public Radio International (PRI). Other guests included Jack Gerard, president of the American Petroleum Institute, and Neil King, veteran energy journalist for the Wall Street Journal. We discussed gasoline prices and how President Obama’s energy policies do and do not affect domestic U.S. oil and gas production. I referred to some of the facts in my column today, “Scoring the rhetoric on Obama’s energy policies.”

Our segment starts at 7:15 and runs for about 45 minutes. I thought it was a remarkably informative and useful panel discussion overall, and I hope you’ll check it out. Listen to it here: To The Point, March 21, 2012 (click the Listen button).

High oil prices: Fortunately and unfortunately

March 14, 2012 at 11:26 am
Contributed by: Chris

For SmartPlanet this week, I surveyed some of the transitions under way in various sectors of the economy in response to high oil prices, and found that mass transit ridership is increasing; airlines are really struggling; trucking and delivery services are trying to pass on higher costs; farmers are having to adopt new practices or relocalize production; and supply chain managers are looking to bring manufacturing back home. Read it here: High oil prices: Fortunately and unfortunately
(more…)

Shoutout: Oil demand sets in the West

March 14, 2012 at 9:00 am
Contributed by: Chris

Peter Kiernan,  lead energy analyst at the Economist Intelligence Unit, blogged my recent piece “Oil demand shift: Asia takes over” on his personal blog Petropolitics yesterday and added his own insights about the geopolitical implications: Oil demand sets in the West

Oil demand shift: Asia takes over

March 7, 2012 at 12:04 pm
Contributed by: Chris

For SmartPlanet this week, I explored data on oil demand, net oil exports, and fuel economy, and found that oil demand from the developing world will overtake demand from the world’s mature economies this year, and will never look back. The U.S. cannot win the race against Asia for vehicle efficiency. Read it here:
Oil demand shift: Asia takes over
(more…)

Good coverage of shale gas in Rolling Stone

March 2, 2012 at 2:53 pm
Contributed by: Chris

Jeff Goodell has a couple of good recent pieces about shale gas in Rolling Stone. The first, an entertaining close-up of Chesapeake CEO Aubrey McClendon and his company’s business model, appears to have drawn heavily from my recent pieces on shale gas, although without direct attribution. The second, out today, speaks to President Obama’s assertion that we have 100 years of shale gas, and does quote my piece in Slate. Goodell is a fun writer to read, and these are worth a look if you are interested in the subject.

Separately, it seems the unfavorable economics of shale gas production are finally hitting the street, as Russia’s Lukoil announced yesterday that it is pulling out of $1.8 billion shale gas deal in the U.S.

Postscript March 5, 2012: I should clarify that I do not agree with all of Goodell’s representations. I also note that Chesapeake has issued a rebuttal and that Art Berman has objected to some of Goodell’s statements about him.

What Reporters Are Getting Wrong About Gas Prices

March 1, 2012 at 7:39 pm
Contributed by: Chris

I was interviewed for a recent article in Media Matters about the poor reportage on gasoline prices. Their energy reporter Jocelyn Fong had liked my article “Why energy journalism is so bad” and wanted to make sure she did her homework and got the story right. I think she did a great job. Read it here:  What Reporters Are Getting Wrong About Gas Prices

A model of oil prices

February 29, 2012 at 9:33 am
Contributed by: Chris

For SmartPlanet this week I offered a model to demystify oil prices. The most important factor is one you’ve probably never heard of, while the ones you hear about aren’t that important. I also showed why unconventional oil from fracked shales will reinforce, not relieve, the pain of high oil prices.  Read it here: A model of oil prices
(more…)

Energy independence, or impending oil shocks?

February 22, 2012 at 12:33 pm
Contributed by: Chris

For SmartPlanet this week, I took a close look at a new report from Citigroup claiming that shale oil production had “buried” the peak oil hypothesis and that the U.S. is on its way to energy independence this decade. Instead, I found that the story of energy independence is just that: a story. The data tells us that we are losing the race against depletion, oil shortages are in our near future, and we had better plan as individuals to confront the impending oil shocks. Read it here: Energy independence, or impending oil shocks?
(more…)

What EROI tells us about ROI

February 15, 2012 at 11:29 am
Contributed by: Chris

For SmartPlanet this week, I explored some new academic research on the relationship between the EROI (energy return on energy invested) and ROI of fuels, and what it can tell us about price, profit, scalability, and the economy as a whole. Savvy investors should begin looking at the EROI of fuels as a guide. Read it here: What EROI tells us about ROI
(more…)

Guest post at Foreign Policy – The Oil & the Glory blog

February 13, 2012 at 9:47 pm
Contributed by: Chris

One of my favorite writers on the geopolitics of energy is Steve LeVine, a highly accomplished journalist who writes a blog called The Oil and the Glory for Foreign Policy (see his bio here.) He liked my recent work on shale gas and offered me a guest post on his blog, which he edited. It’s a short, summary piece which he published today, so head over there and check it out if you’re so inclined: Is there really so much shale gas in the ground?

Everything you know about shale gas is wrong

February 8, 2012 at 10:53 am
Contributed by: Chris

For SmartPlanet this week, I reviewed new data from petroleum geologist Arthur Berman showing that total U.S. gas production has plateaued for the past two years, in sharp contrast to the data offered by EIA. Production is actually declining in major shale gas plays because it has become unprofitable, and the outlook for future production is becoming more dubious. According to Berman, the shale gas gold rush is over. Read it here: Everything you know about shale gas is wrong
(more…)

The politics of peak oil

February 1, 2012 at 10:09 am
Contributed by: Chris

For SmartPlanet this week I reviewed a new article on peak oil published in the journal Nature by James Murray and David King, along with articles about it that followed, and tried to set the record straight about what “peak oil” means and why some in the press still get it wrong. Read it here: The politics of peak oil
(more…)

The Siren song of LNG exports

January 25, 2012 at 2:18 pm
Contributed by: Chris

For SmartPlanet this week, I compared the new expected demands for US natural gas to the data on supply, and concluded that exporting LNG could be a grave policy error. Read it here: The Siren song of LNG exports
(more…)

The revolution will be bottom-up

January 18, 2012 at 12:16 pm
Contributed by: Chris

For SmartPlanet this week, I looked at various ways that ordinary people are finding ways to reduce their energy consumption, relocalize food production, and create more sustainable communities in the absence of effective top-down leadership.  Read it here: The revolution will be bottom-up
(more…)

Interview with Financial Sense January 13, 2012

January 18, 2012 at 11:34 am
Contributed by: Chris

I appeared on the Financial Sense with Jim Puplava program last Friday, in a segment they titled “Political Stand-off in US Energy Policy.” We discussed energy security, the vulnerability of island nations to liquid fuel supply, the Keystone XL pipeline, the Left-Right stalemate over energy policy, the failure of our leadership to grapple with energy and transportation transitions, the “narrow ledge” of oil prices, and how oil has effectively replaced the Fed as the primary moderator of the economy.

You can download the show (21 mins) here: RealPlayer | WinAmp | Windows Media | MP3

See also: 

Energy politics at the piano bar

Reframing the transportation debate

The narrow ledge of oil prices

Have we reached an inflection point in economics history?

Regulation and the decline of coal power

January 11, 2012 at 11:54 am
Contributed by: Chris

For SmartPlanet this week I offered a deep dive into the data on coal-fired power, and found a sector that’s well into decline, but not just because of EPA clean air regulations. Read it here: Regulation and the decline of coal power
(more…)

Three deformations of the apocalypse

January 4, 2012 at 3:07 pm
Contributed by: Chris

For SmartPlanet this week, I took up a reader’s suggestion and offered three different outlooks on the next five years: the good, the bad, and the likely. Read it here:

Three deformations of the apocalypse
(more…)

New interview with Dr. Colin Campbell

January 4, 2012 at 3:04 pm
Contributed by: Chris

There is a terrific new half-hour interview with Dr. Colin Campbell on a West Cork, Ireland website, which anyone interested in peak oil, the economy, transition, and the future will want to watch. Dr. Campbell, as longtime readers of this blog know, was my first source of knowledge about peak oil, and I read his wonderful newsletter religiously. Campbell and  Jean Laherrère were among the first serious analysts to expand upon the work of M. King Hubbert in the mid-1990s, and along with several others, founded the Association for the Study of Peak Oil (ASPO) and gave birth to the modern study of peak oil (use the search function on this site to explore all of those names and newsletters further). Having a pint with Dr. Campbell still ranks right up top on my “bucket list.” Here’s the interview:

In conversation with Dr. Colin Campbell, Ballydehob, West Cork, Ireland

Campbell was also featured on the ‘Eco Eye’ program on Irish Television last night. If you’re in the UK you can probably see it, but sadly, they don’t allow it to be viewed from here in the US. Here is the link: http://www.rte.ie/player/#!v=1129353


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